How to Thread a Brother Sewing Machine

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Brother sewing machines are very popular both for high-volume commercial use and for creative embroidery. If you are using one of these machines for the first time, learning how to thread a brother sewing machine is one of the first things that you should know.

While some may say that it is quite challenging, with these hints and tips, you will find that threading your machine is as easy as can be. With some practice, you will come to realize that threading your Brother machine becomes something intuitive, something you do not even need to think about.

Start by shedding some light on your needle.

Before you can start learning how to thread a Brother sewing machine, you must first be aware of the different types of needles there is. Brother sewing machines can be equipped with various types of needles. In fact, there are specialized needles that are designed to work with denim, as well as hardy all-purpose needles that can be used for general embroidery. No matter what type of needle you have, though, the step-by-step guide provided below will help you to thread it.

Brother sewing machines are usually equipped with needle lights, which are little bulbs beside the needle that light up so that you can clearly see it. With that said, the first helpful step for threading your machine is to flick your needle light on so you can see exactly what you are working with.

If you are finding it a little hard to see your needle still, even with the need light turned on, you can try purchasing a stronger bulb from Brother. Over the years, they have designed and manufactured a wide range of different needle lights.

How to Thread a Brother Sewing Machine: A Step-by-Step Guide

Once you have achieved a rather well-lit workstation, you can now begin threading your Brother sewing machine. Below, you will find an easy-to-understand, step-by-step guide that can help you do it properly.

Step 1: Get the needle in the right position

Rotate the hand wheel (the wheel on the side of the sewing machine) to disengage the needle. Or, in other words, to lift the needle up and away from the surface of the cloth that you are going to sew.

Step 2: Load up the bobbin

The bobbin looks like a little spool of thread, minus any thread on. It is located in a small compartment towards the top of the machine. Once you have located it, take out the bobbin, slot your thread onto it, and replace it.

There is a little hole beside the bobbin where the end of the thread should be able to poke out so that you can grab it. Your sewing machine is now loaded with thread! Make sure that the thread is the right size, color, and type for the job in hand so as not to waste time and effort.

Step 3: Get the tension right

Now, take the end of your thread and wind it through the tension loop, which is a little metal loop that you will find on the side of the sewing machine. This helps keep your thread nice and tense and running in a straight line as you sew so that it does not flop around everywhere and get tangled.

Step 4: Back to the needle

After that, take the end of the thread and pull it gently until it reaches the needle. There, you will notice a small hole in the bottom of the needle. Thread your thread through this hole. While there is no need to tie a knot in the thread, you should make sure that there is an inch or so of thread poking through the other side of the hole when you thread the needle.

Step 5: Re-engage the needle

Finally, you need to lower your needle back down to its original position close to the cloth. This can be done by rotating the wheel back the other way until you hear a click. This click lets you know that the needle is back in position.

Problems threading the needle?

If you have problems threading your needle, it could be because the end of the thread is frayed. As a result, the thread is too chunky to pass through the hole in the needle. Rectify this by snipping it cleanly with your sewing scissors to give it a neat edge again.

Alternatively, you can also try wetting the end of the thread and twisting it a little between your fingers to make it thinner. In general, though, sewing machine thread is very thin (yet strong) while the holes in Brother sewing machine needles are nice and wide, so threading is reasonably easy when you get the hang of it.

Automatic Needle Threading

For those not looking to thread their own needles it may be worth looking for a sewing machine that offers automatic needle threading, which is a very common feature on modern machines. This works through the use of a lever that guides the thread through the eye of the needle.

Automatic needle threading is great for beginners who may not be as confident when it comes to threading their own machines. However, professionals also like this feature as it makes their lives easier and more convenient.

How to Choose the Correct Thread

As what we have mentioned earlier, it is also important to match the thread that you are using to the type of fabric that you will be working on. Hence, firstly, you will need to decide whether you will be darning, sewing, or embroidering. This will lead you to decide what type of thread is most practical—be that cotton, nylon, metallic, or what-not.

Cotton threads are best for common sewing practices or when working with delicate fabrics. They also blend exceptionally well as they are often mercerized, allowing them to soak up dyes better than other threads.

Polyester threads are incredibly strong and have excellent give. They are often coated with a wax or silicone finish, which allows for minimal friction. These threads are great for fabrics with a bit more stretch, such as knits or woven synthetics.

Heavy-duty threads are often used for soft furnishings, upholstery, or heavy leather garments. These are usually made from a polyester-cotton blend with size 40.

Silk threads are incredibly fine and often reserved for intricate embroidery work, but they can also be used when working with silk or wool fabrics. Silk threads are incredibly flexible and don’t leave holes, which makes them great for tailoring.

Lastly, it is also important to match the thread color to the fabric correctly. It is a good idea to purchase a whole range of thread quality in the same color on a per-project basis to allow yourself greater flexibility when working.

Start by shedding some light on your needle.

Before you can start learning how to thread a Brother sewing machine, you must first be aware of the different types of needles there is. Brother sewing machines can be equipped with various types of needles. In fact, there are specialized needles that are designed to work with denim, as well as hardy all-purpose needles that can be used for general embroidery. No matter what type of needle you have, though, the step-by-step guide provided below will help you to thread it.

Brother sewing machines are usually equipped with needle lights, which are little bulbs beside the needle that light up so that you can clearly see it. With that said, the first helpful step for threading your machine is to flick your needle light on so you can see exactly what you are working with.

If you are finding it a little hard to see your needle still, even with the need light turned on, you can try purchasing a stronger bulb from Brother. Over the years, they have designed and manufactured a wide range of different needle lights.

How to Thread a Brother Sewing Machine: A Step-by-Step Guide

Once you have achieved a rather well-lit workstation, you can now begin threading your Brother sewing machine. Below, you will find an easy-to-understand, step-by-step guide that can help you do it properly.

Step 1: Get the needle in the right position

Rotate the hand wheel (the wheel on the side of the sewing machine) to disengage the needle. Or, in other words, to lift the needle up and away from the surface of the cloth that you are going to sew.

Step 2: Load up the bobbin

The bobbin looks like a little spool of thread, minus any thread on. It is located in a small compartment towards the top of the machine. Once you have located it, take out the bobbin, slot your thread onto it, and replace it.

There is a little hole beside the bobbin where the end of the thread should be able to poke out so that you can grab it. Your sewing machine is now loaded with thread! Make sure that the thread is the right size, color, and type for the job in hand so as not to waste time and effort.

Step 3: Get the tension right

Now, take the end of your thread and wind it through the tension loop, which is a little metal loop that you will find on the side of the sewing machine. This helps keep your thread nice and tense and running in a straight line as you sew so that it does not flop around everywhere and get tangled.

Step 4: Back to the needle

After that, take the end of the thread and pull it gently until it reaches the needle. There, you will notice a small hole in the bottom of the needle. Thread your thread through this hole. While there is no need to tie a knot in the thread, you should make sure that there is an inch or so of thread poking through the other side of the hole when you thread the needle.

Step 5: Reengage the needle

Finally, you need to lower your needle back down to its original position close to the cloth. This can be done by rotating the wheel back the other way until you hear a click. This click lets you know that the needle is back in position.

Problems threading the needle?

If you have problems threading your needle, it could be because the end of the thread is frayed. As a result, the thread is too chunky to pass through the hole in the needle. Rectify this by snipping it cleanly with your sewing scissors to give it a neat edge again.

Alternatively, you can also try wetting the end of the thread and twisting it a little between your fingers to make it thinner. In general, though, sewing machine thread is very thin (yet strong) while the holes in Brother sewing machine needles are nice and wide, so threading is reasonably easy when you get the hang of it.

Automatic Needle Threading

For those not looking to thread their own needles it may be worth looking for a sewing machine that offers automatic needle threading, which is a very common feature on modern machines. This works through the use of a lever that guides the thread through the eye of the needle.

Automatic needle threading is great for beginners who may not be as confident when it comes to threading their own machines. However, professionals also like this feature as it makes their lives easier and more convenient.

How to Choose the Correct Thread

As what we have mentioned earlier, it is also important to match the thread that you are using to the type of fabric that you will be working on. Hence, firstly, you will need to decide whether you will be darning, sewing, or embroidering. This will lead you to decide what type of thread is most practical—be that cotton, nylon, metallic, or what-not.

Cotton threads are best for common sewing practices or when working with delicate fabrics. They also blend exceptionally well as they are often mercerized, allowing them to soak up dyes better than other threads.

Polyester threads are incredibly strong and have excellent give. They are often coated with a wax or silicone finish, which allows for minimal friction. These threads are great for fabrics with a bit more stretch, such as knits or woven synthetics.

Heavy-duty threads are often used for soft furnishings, upholstery, or heavy leather garments. These are usually made from a polyester-cotton blend with size 40.

Silk threads are incredibly fine and often reserved for intricate embroidery work, but they can also be used when working with silk or wool fabrics. Silk threads are incredibly flexible and don’t leave holes, which makes them great for tailoring.

Lastly, it is also important to match the thread color to the fabric correctly. It is a good idea to purchase a whole range of thread quality in the same color on a per-project basis to allow yourself greater flexibility when working.

Here is a nice video on how to thread a brother sewing machine:

Final Words

Once your needle has been threaded, you would now want to start sewing. Remember, though, that we did not tie a knot in the thread as we would do if we were sewing by hand. With that said, when you begin to sew, never forget to hold the cloth static and start the needle running for a couple of seconds before you start moving the fabric to create a seam, as this creates a secure knot and stops the thread from slipping through the fabric.

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